Arts-Based Community Development Events

Bringing Our Communities Together Through Art.

The Community and Public Arts Department at RAC offers programming to continue the training and education of our CAT Institute alumni and to expand the network of community arts practitioners beyond our CAT Institute alumni. These programs range from local workshops, networking opportunities, and mini-conferences to larger convenings that attract attendance from all corners of the world. By offering opportunities for those working at the intersection of art and community to network locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally, RAC continues to shape and influence the fields of arts-based community development and creative place-making.

Upcoming Events:

WORKSHOPS:

THE ART OF SOCIAL CHANGE: A Professional Development Series Exploring Art & Social Change

Show Up and Be Seen: Preparing for Your Arena Moment
Thursday May 11, 2017 | 8:30 – 10:30 a.m.
Washington University’s Brown School of Social Work (Location TBD)

Presenter: Kristi Nigh, MSW, LCSW, CPCC, ACC, CDWF, Adjunct Faculty, Brown School, Owner & Professional Coach, Kristi Nigh Coaching

When we’re getting ready to put our big ideas into the world – whether a new song, work of art, or act of social change – it’s almost inevitable to feel the urge to shrink back and play small. Critics – real or imagined, external or internal – can cause us to feel vulnerable and hold us back.

This interactive, hands-on workshop will equip you with practical tools to work through internal and external resistance, to serve the world in whichever way you’re meant to. We will prepare for the vulnerability of creating acts of social and cultural change through increasing personal awareness of potential obstacles that may arise, including navigating external criticism and self-sabotaging. We will work on proactively developing coping strategies so that you’ll leave with a set of tools and exercises to help you launch your next big idea. The world needs your creativity, passion, and fulfillment of purpose – this workshop will help you step out into the “arena” to make it happen.

Register Here. Registration is required. Class size is limited to 35.  $15 general admission, $25 with 2 Social Work CEUs.

This program is co-sponsored by the Regional Arts Commission and Washington University’s Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and George Warren Brown School of Social Work. 

Past Events:

CONVENINGS AND CONFERENCES:

In 2016, RAC hosted CULTURE/SHIFT, a national convening on community arts, cultural policy, and social justice.

In 2013 and 2014, RAC hosted two workshops, Off the Charts: Data and the Arts for Social Change and Mind the Gap: Stepping into Arts-Based Collective Action. More information coming soon with archived photographs and details about the workshops.

In 2010 and 2012, RAC organized two conferences, or convenings, exploring how art and artists will choose to impact our community in the future. Please visit 2010 At the Crossroads: A Community Arts and Development Convening and 2012 Rust Belt to Artist Belt to learn more.

WORKSHOPS:

THE ART OF SOCIAL CHANGE: A Professional Development Series Exploring Art & Social Change

Introduction to Digital Storytelling – Engaging Community through the Power of Story, Sound, and Image
Wednesday February 22, 2017 | 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Washington University’s Steinberg Hall, Steinberg Gallery (Consult this map (#109) for more information)

Presenters: Michael Pagano, Artist, Designer, Facilitator;  Elaine Cha, Catalyst, Forward Through Ferguson

Storytelling and community engagement go hand-in-hand to spark dialog, raise awareness, and inspire action. When storytelling is coupled with digital video, our stories have the potential to reach massive audiences and help diversify our media landscape. This workshop is designed to familiarize people with the process of creating digital stories or videos to tell and share stories of impact. In this brief workshop experience, you will be participating in small and large group activities to craft statements and messages. These will be recorded and edited together to tell a short story. Participants will strengthen their abilities to share their voices and perspectives through today’s dominant communication platforms. The class is meant as an exposure experience; mastery of the skills we will be discussing requires more extensive training. Class size is limited to 35.

This program is co-sponsored by the Regional Arts Commission and Washington University’s Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and George Warren Brown School of Social Work. 

Inspiring a Movement – Using Images to Motivate and Agitate
Tuesday October 25, 2016  | 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Regional Arts Commission, 6128 Delmar Blvd, St. Louis, 63112

Imagery is a critical tool for organizing and moving groups of people to take action in response to a social issue or other cause. Consider the impact sparked by iconic images such as the images of “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” that were plastered on boarded up businesses in Ferguson, and Shepard Fairey’s “Hope” poster of Barack Obama. This interactive workshop is for anyone interested in exploring communication tactics that inspire, agitate, and otherwise motivate viewers to respond with action. The workshop will explore some ways that art and design can inspire organizing through the strategic use of images and text. Presentation and discussion will involve successful examples from different fields and moments in history, focusing specifically on posters. Participants will then design and create a poster of their own.  Class size is limited to 35.

Presenters: Lisa Bulawsky, MFA, Professor of Art, Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Director, Island Press,  Washington University in St. Louis;  Penina Acayo, MFA, Assistant Professor, Communication Design, Washington University in St. Louis

This program is co-sponsored by the Regional Arts Commission and Washington University’s Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and George Warren Brown School of Social Work. 

The Art of Social Change: Creating Justice by Examining Our Relationships to Power & Privilege
Monday March 7, 2016, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Regional Arts Commission, 6128 Delmar Blvd, St Louis, MO 63112

Explore how we experience power and privilege.  Through visual arts, participants will identify their own social and cultural identities and the impact of identity on one’s attitudes, actions, relationships, and decisions.  Participants will also gain skills on how create a more equitable society. Class members will have the opportunity to:

  • Define power and privilege
  • Understand their own identities and their relationship to power and privilege using the visual arts
  • Assess their strengths and assets when holding with certain identities
  • Learn how they can use their power and privilege to create equitable environments
  • Create Call to Action Plans in order to creating justice in their communities.

Presenters: Sarah Paulsen, MFA, Artist in Residence, Marian Middle School; Stefani Weeden-Smith, MPS, Program Director, NCCJ St. Louis.

This program is co-sponsored by the Regional Arts Commission and Washington University’s Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement, and George Warren Brown School of Social Work. 

The Art of Social Change: Artivism – Uniting Art and Activism for Racial Justice and Healing
Thursday May 12, 2016, 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Washington University, Hillman Hall, Room 120, St Louis, MO 63112

This interactive workshop will train participants on the practice of artivism (art + activism).  The class includes an introduction to various approaches of sparking creative direct actions, using art as a tool for advocacy and story gathering, and addressing matters of self-care in social justice and social movements. The session will use a racial justice lens in reflection of the current and national movement for Black lives that sparked following the unrest in Ferguson.

You will learn best practices and examine local examples of how creative direct actions have driven change and awareness in the movement. Participants will create prototypes of artworks and receive tools to organize creative campaigns and actions within their respective communities and causes.

Presenters: De Andrea Nichols, MSW, BFA, Founder and Creative Director, Civic Creatives, Community Engagement Manager, Contemporary Art Museum; Elizabeth Vega, Founder, Artivists STL, Owner, R.O.O.T.S Co-op

This program is co-sponsored by the Regional Arts Commission and Washington University’s Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement, and George Warren Brown School of Social Work. 

The Art of Social Change: Better Together – Maximizing Community Collaborations
Wednesday July 27, 2016, 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
The program will be held on Washington University’s Danforth Campus with location TBA.

Reciprocal partnerships are key to successful collaborations. This interactive workshop will identify opportunities for long-term integration of arts into reciprocal relationships in a variety of settings. Participants will examine the arch of partnerships from methods for identifying and developing potential partnerships to sunsetting and changing relationships and partnerships over time. Group exercises will give you practice applying these skills.

Presenters: Jenni Harpring, MSW, MAPS, Assistant Director for Campus and Community Partnerships, Washington University; Jenny Murphy, BFA, Artist, Social Entrepreneur, and CAT Alum, Founder/Executive Director, Perennial

This program is co-sponsored by the Regional Arts Commission and Washington University’s Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement, and George Warren Brown School of Social Work.

THE ST. LOUIS IMAGINING OF THE USDAC
Saturday July 12, 2014, 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Community Arts Movement Project (C.A.M.P.) 3022 S Cherokee St, St Louis, MO 63118

You are invited to join the conversation about art and culture as the catalysts for community renewal, about cultivating the imagination and empathy we need to create a  future we want to inhabit. What would our community be like in 2034 if arts and culture were central to all aspects of our lives? This is an act of collective imagination. Add yours!

OFF THE CHARTS! 2: DATA AND THE ARTS FOR SOCIAL CHANGE
Friday, July 18, 2014, 9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Regional Arts Commission (6128 Delmar Blvd.)

Attend this full day workshop to explore the possibilities of how data, health, art, and community come together for social change. Please check out our facebook page for more information.