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Gyo Obata Fellowship

The Gyo Obata Fellowship is a program for undergraduate students pursuing careers in arts management. With major funding provided by the Gateway Foundation, the program will address the need for a more diverse, inclusive, and equitable local nonprofit arts and culture sector.

The Gyo Obata Fellowship is a substantive, full-time, summer work opportunity for college undergraduates from backgrounds that have been traditionally underrepresented in the arts. The 10-week paid summer fellowship program will provide a minimum of ten college students working towards careers in arts administration with a hands-on introduction to arts nonprofits in St. Louis City and County.

 

 

 

Application Process

Applications will open for the Gyo Obata Fellowship in the Fall of 2022. In order to be eligible for the program, students must meet the following qualifications:

  • Currently enrolled in any bachelor’s degree-seeking program of an accredited college or university in the greater St. Louis area.
  • Students who are enrolled in an accredited college or university outside of the St. Louis area may apply but must reside in St. Louis City or County.
  • Entering their third or fourth year of undergraduate studies, have at least 60 credit hours from an accredited college or university, or have graduated within a year of the program start date.
  • Must also be able to legally work within the United States.

 

Gyo Obata Fellowship Featured by HEC-TV

Gyo Obata Fellowship Featured by KSDK

Meet the 2022 Gyo Obata Fellows

Marissa Camp

Central Print

“It’s really interesting seeing how much effort and strategy that goes into funding nonprofits and arts programming. From writing grants and fundraising, to marketing and advertising, to engaging the board and seeking community approval, there is a lot of navigating around problems and finding creative solutions that keeps spaces like these operating smoothly.”

Kimberly Murphy

National Blues Museum 

 

“My organization has a very small administrative staff, but the office space is open and collaborative. Every day I am immersed in musical history. The music, history and culture are thought provoking. It challenges you to learn how to serve your audience in the best way, developing programming they will find educational and entertaining.”

Kayla Fields

Perennial

“I loved the message that Gyo Obata as both a fellowship and as an individual had wanted to share with the world. The fellowship is very inclusive and inviting and as a non-binary individual is something that I will always admire.”

Tremont Davis

St. Louis ArtWorks

“My internship helped me appreciate the nonprofit arts sector in St. Louis by exposing me to numerous upcoming and established artists with great personal stories and personalities. I was able to connect with many people and resources that I can use for personal growth and share with others.”

Orquidea Campbell-Espinoza

COCA

“There are new challenges and things to do everyday, which is what makes COCA so wonderful. The energy from having so many kids and artists in the building at one time is such an interesting experience, and it is such a warm and inviting place. To have such a large interdisciplinary center for young artists to be supported and guided is so important.”

Gigi Florek

Intersect Arts Center

“Prior to the fellowship, I was largely unaware of how a nonprofit functioned. It has been interesting to learn about the grants and funding that are involved in helping the organization run. I also appreciate the community among artists that the staff at Intersect has worked to build.”

Zipporah Cunningham

Springboard to Learning 

“What surprised me about arts management was all the different aspects that goes into it and the impact it has on the organization. For instance, Springboard takes so much time into creating art packs to give to schools and programs. Seeing students use these art packs and how it affects them positively was impactful. The organization makes hires excellent teaching artists that encourage young students to learn. Visiting the schools to see these teaching artists in action is such an enjoyable experience because younger kids were really engaged, having tons of fun, and learning at the same time.”

Janice Sutton

Cinema St. Louis

“I decided to apply for the Gyo Obata Fellowship because it seemed like a great chance to gain arts administration experience at several possible host companies. During my time at Cinema St. Louis, I learned about the daily routine and communications of an arts non-profit. The internship helped me appreciate the many events that the local non-profits put on that I didn’t know about beforehand.”

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